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Nautical Lore – Modern | Oral narratives of modern seafaring watercraft with multihull pioneer Jim Brown

Oral narratives of modern seafaring watercraft, their concepts, creators and crews. This ongoing series of “capers” tells of epic voyages, castaway survivors, swashbuckling characters, family cruises, cultural setbacks, technical breakthroughs, racing triumphs, and the “seasteading” lifestyle. Revealed within these stories are many details of design, construction, operation and seamanship. Since World War Two, the emergence of truly modern, lightweight vessels – recreational and commercial, multihull and monohull, power and sail – constitutes a sea change in marine architecture that may well persist for generations to come. Because modern seafaring has advanced so fast, and yet history often neglects its oral heritage, now is the time for us to gather and share this legacy. See more at www.outrigmedia.com
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Nautical Lore – Modern | Oral narratives of modern seafaring watercraft with multihull pioneer Jim Brown
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Now displaying: January, 2018
Jan 25, 2018
THE MULTIHULL PHENOMENON
 
To assure our new listeners that these capers are about people as much as they are about boats, this issue  starts with an old boat making news.
 
It's an example of how the postwar "Can-Do Generation"  dragged multihulls from "the lunatic fringe"  into the main stream. It brings old boats into the conversation again, and then stands back for a wide view of "The Multihull Phenomenon," then and now.
Jan 18, 2018
HOW SEARUNNERS CAME TO BE
 
This is Part Two of the audio update to Chapter 5 of Among The Multihulls, which concludes the evolution -- in the 1960s and 70s -- of the Searunner Trimaran design series. It finishes with a highly qualified appraisal of this type of vessel.
 
This story is not intended to convince anyone to build a Searunner today, but instead to explain why a visit to the "Classic Multihulls"  thread on Facebook reveals quite a few of these vessels still in use.
 
For example, Bruce Matlack and his son Charlie crossed the Gulf Stream to the Bahamas last Saturday night. They had to push SCRIMSHAW pretty hard to windward, in strong winds and square waves, on the starboard tack. This put the newly repaired portside float hull (badly damaged in a hurricane last fall) "practically underwater" for 13 hours. This attests to the efficacy of repairs made by Jeff Gof to that float. He restored this 46 yea-old plywood trimaran, built before epoxy, tor "Gulp Stream" service.
 
I wish I could have been there.
Jan 11, 2018

PRISON ISLAND

This caper takes me back to Mexico to retrieve Juana from the canners at Sabo. We then stumble into a delightful cove on an island where we are not supposed to be, but there is nobody around.

We play Robinson Crusoe, catch a lift home, and meander towards the days of Searunner trimerans. But we don't get there because of computer problems, and I may not see you next week. If not, Joe Farinaccio will let you know why.

Jan 4, 2018

WITH A CREW OF FOUR (ONE GESTATING)

This is the audio update for Chapter 4 of my book “Among The Multihulls - Volume 1.” It tells of our coastal voyage in the 24' trimaran Juana, probably the first modern trimaran to venture offshore, 1959.

It's an old story, told here with some new details -- let's call them embellishments -- intended to help place the early-modern multihull into the historical context of the time. With the boat sadly overloaded, sailing in the storm season, and with my wife Jo Anna over five months pregnant, we made every mistake possible, yet our surfable, beachable boat -- and the gracious, local fisherfolk -- saved us from harm.

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